English Language Center (ELC)

What is the CCQ Foundation English Programme?
The CCQ Foundation English Programme is run by the English Language Center (ELC) of CCQ, and is designed to prepare students for entry to CCQ college courses in both the English and Arabic tracks.
The Foundation English Program follows an integrated approach in teaching the four basic skills of Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking, with a focus on fluency and accuracy. In addition, courses make extensive use of audio-visual aids so as to give students more opportunities to interact with the language in a more relaxed environment.

The English Language Center (ELC)
The ELC is chaired by Waqar Khan and assisted by the coordinators, Tatiano Babenko and Marwa ElDeib. The ELC instructors strive to deliver lessons that are both engaging and challenging. The multi-national aspect of the team allows students to be exposed to a variety of English teaching methodologies and teaching styles.

Programme Structure
The ELC offers four levels in intensive English language instruction. Students have two instructors each term and attend Reading and Writing, and Speaking and Listening classes. Students can study in the morning or in the evening. Each level consists of 20 hours of classroom instruction and 4 hours of project work in the Student Learning Center (SLC). There are five terms per year and each term is 8 weeks in length.

The Student Learning Center (SLC)
The SLC serves as a learning center for the ELC where students can learn, use and practice English through project-based or skills-focused activities. The activities are mostly student-led and carried out in groups or individual assignments set by their instructors and supervised by the SLC Coordinators. With an assortment of level-appropriate graded reader books, CALL resources, and project ideas, the SLC provides students with ample support and opportunities to engage in independent studies outside of the classroom.

Sample of course learning outcomes:
Upon completing level 1, a student should be able to:

• follow short, simple texts on familiar matters of a concrete type (articles, extracts from textbooks, websites, advertisements, leaflets, etc.) with high frequency everyday language

• achieve general understanding of the content and context

• follow short dialogues, instructions, and conversations when clearly articulated

• follow the listening texts with the highest frequency vocabulary related to areas of most immediate personal relevance

• write simple texts on familiar topics linked with most frequent connectors (e.g. and, but, because, so)

• give simple descriptions and short, rehearsed, basic presentations using most frequent connectors

• communicate in simple and routine tasks requiring a simple and direct exchange of information in short conversations on familiar topics (self, job, countries, immigration, family, living conditions, education, etc.) in predictable everyday situations

• assess their prior knowledge of content

• relate personal experiences to topics

• apply information from other sources to their own situation

Upon completing level 2, a student should be able to:

• follow short, simple texts on familiar matters of a concrete type (articles, extracts from textbooks, websites, advertisements, leaflets, etc.) with high frequency everyday language

• achieve general and detailed understanding on the content and context by skimming and scanning

• differentiate between facts and opinion and draw conclusion

• follow 3-3.5 minutes dialogues, instructions, and conversations when articulated at normal pace

• follow the listening texts with the highest frequency vocabulary related to areas of most immediate personal relevance

• write 3 connecting paragraphs (using transitional devices of addition, contrast, comparison, cause and effect, conclusion and introduction) with compound and complex sentences

• write opinion, explanatory and compare and contrast paragraphs

• give simple descriptions (without codes switching), make a talk, do short & pre-prepared presentations (monologue/story telling), ask and give opinions (role play)

• communicate in simple and routine tasks requiring a simple and direct exchange of information in short conversations on familiar topics (sports, emotions, values, cycle of age and development, change and development) in predictable everyday situations

• assess their prior knowledge of content, apply information from other sources to their own situation

• and relate personal experiences to topics

• analyze reasons/causes and results/effects


Upon completing level 3, a student should be able to:

• identify main ideas and specific information in short straightforward and clearly signaled texts

• follow the main points of clear standard speech on familiar matters and on current affairs

• write continuous and intelligible short texts in which elements are connected

• enter into conversation on topics that are familiar, of personal interest or pertinent to everyday life (emotions, feelings, fame, values, mannerism, etc.)

• give simple descriptions and short, rehearsed and extempore basic presentations

• give reasons and explanations for opinions

• give and seek personal views and opinions in an informal discussion

• recognize their own mistakes and lack of vocabulary during communication

• monitor their own work with a teacher given pre-prepared checklist

• assess their prior knowledge of content and relate personal experiences to topics

• apply information from other sources to their own situation.

• analyze for reasons/causes and results/effects


Upon completing level 4, a student should be able to:

• identify main ideas and specific information in straightforward and clearly signaled texts with high frequency everyday language with a relatively wide vocabulary range

• follow the main points of clear standard speech on familiar matters and on current affairs and on topics of personal or professional interest

• write continuous and intelligible texts in which elements are connected

• enter into conversation on topics that are familiar, of personal interest or pertinent to everyday life (values/ mannerism, competition, success, business, family, trends, environmental issues, and etc.)

• give detailed descriptions and rehearsed and extempore presentations of 4-5 minutes

• give reasons and explanations for opinions and plans

• give and seek personal views and opinions in an informal and formal discussion

• recognize and appropriate lack of vocabulary during communication

• monitor their own work with a student-prepared checklist

• assess their prior knowledge of content and relate personal experiences to topics

• apply information from other sources to their own situation.

• analyze for reasons/causes and results/effects and present reflections

• collaborate to solve a problem


Progression
In order to progress from one level to the next, a student must have an average grade in the two classes of 70% (C) or higher at the end of the term. Students must attend classes in accordance with CCQ attendance policy. A student who exceeds 12.5% absences from the course is dropped and can re-enroll in the level according to administration regulations, which is usually the next term or the second term after being dropped.

Registration and Placement Tests
A student is placed into the ELC through a variety of methods; such as an IELTS score, TOEFL score, or SAT score. The most common method is through the CCQ administered ACCUPLACER placement test.

Student Support
CCQ Student Services offer academic advising, counselling, and special needs services.

Committees
The ELC consists of a number of committees including the following:

Student Affairs Committee (SAC)
SAC is always keen on clarifying and maintaining CCQ/ELC rules, policies and regulations. SAC members do their best not only to help and cooperate with ELC teachers to overcome all sorts of disciplinary problems, but also to guide and council ELC students on how to deal with any academic problems. Every new term, SAC holds four orientation sessions, two on each campus, to orient new ELC students in order to be familiar with CCQ rules and policies regarding their attendance and academic commitments, and to make sure that CCQ/ELC rules, policies and regulations are followed when dealing with any academic/disciplinary issue. Last but not least, SAC aims to liaise ELC students’ communications with the college and the ELC management.

Community Service Committee
In the last 2 years the ELC's Community Service Committee has raised over 110,00 QAR for charitable organizations in Qatar and beyond. It is our sole aim and mission to provide CCQ faculty, staff and students the opportunity to participate in philanthropic projects that go hand in hand with the college's commitment to community outreach and engagement. Each year we organize on-campus blood donations, collect clothing and supplies for refugees, visit animal welfare centers and take part in charity fun runs. This year we have an ambitious goal of creating an international development link with a school in Zanzibar, Tanzania and taking CCQ staff on a visit to the country in May 2017. Our committee hopes to raise awareness of community service projects in Qatar and to not let us forget that there are many less fortunate than ourselves and it's our duty to assist in any way we can.

Professional Development Committee
The Professional Development Committee’s vision is to improve student academic achievement by providing the ELC faculty with on-going and sustainable opportunities for learning, collaboration and renewal. The committee focuses on the development of knowledge about curricular content, educational theory, effective learning practice, and teacher-leadership.

The Educational Technology Committee
The main goal of the Education Technology Committee is to expand the use of innovative technology to enhance education programs and services by creating, gathering and uploading learning materials through an ELC Online Resource Portal, and providing support for faculty for Blackboard. The transition to using Blackboard and creation of the portal for the effective use of ELC Faculty and students was in large part due to a really engaged EdTech committee participating in all phases of the process: brain storming, research, evaluation, testing, training and most importantly communicating with each other and the ELC faculty. We act as an effective liaison between the ELC faculty and the IT department. In addition, we have the responsibility to represent the end-user, be it management, faculty, students or staff, and place student learning and success above all else in our recommendation related to technology. Since technology is pervasive across every area of the Centre, the committee works closely with other committees to develop a shared vision in keeping with the College’s strategic plan.

Examinations Committee
The examinations committee produces unique midterm and final exams every term.

The Curriculum Committee
The curriculum committee works on the curriculum.

The Scheduling Committee
The scheduling committee works on the schedule.